waterqualitytestinglakeland

Water Quality Testing Lakeland – AKA Water Solutions FL

Have The Lakeland Water Testing Specialist provide exceptional water testing services for your home. Specializing in helping Lakeland, FL, homeowners get clean and safe drinking water.

Your Trusted Lakeland Water Quality Testing Source

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Serving Lakeland, Florida and surrounding areas, we have been in the water treatment business since 2017.

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    Effectiveness. Our tests have found that having a good water filter can be quite effective with contaminants, flavor and odor reduction.
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    Easy to Use. Our water filters are easy to use… and even better, they help give you fresher and cleaner tasting and smelling water throughout your property.

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    We transform ordinary tap water into cleaner, softer water

    If you were searching Google for the phrase Water Quality Testing Lakeland and found this page, you are in the right place.

    We are the foolproof way to select a quality filter.

    We offer high-tech solutions in the field of water purification that meet the most stringent quality standards and customer requirements in the state of Florida. Purification is carried out with the help of innovative developments of the brand.

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    Water Solutions FAQs

     

    Is the well water at my Lakeland home safe to drink?

    The safety of well water depends on a variety of factors such as the location of the well, the depth of the well, the geological conditions, and the level of human activities in the surrounding area. In general, well water can be safe to drink if it is tested regularly and treated properly, but there are potential risks to be aware of.

    One risk associated with well water is the presence of contaminants such as bacteria, viruses, parasites, heavy metals, and chemicals. These contaminants can enter the water supply from natural sources, such as minerals in the surrounding soil, or from human activities, such as agricultural or industrial practices. Testing well water for these contaminants is crucial to determine if treatment is necessary.

    Another risk is the potential for well water to become contaminated from nearby septic systems or other sources of pollution. This risk can be mitigated by ensuring that the well is properly constructed and located away from potential sources of contamination.

    It is recommended that private wells be tested at least once a year for bacteria, nitrates, and other contaminants. If any issues are found, treatment options are available to make the water safe to drink. It’s also important to properly maintain the well, including regular inspections and cleaning, to ensure its continued safety.

    Overall, well water can be safe to drink if it is properly tested, treated, and maintained. It’s important to stay vigilant and address any potential risks to ensure the safety of your drinking water.

     

    How can I know if my well water is safe to drink?

    The only way to determine if your well water is safe to drink is by having it tested by a certified laboratory. It’s important to have your well water tested regularly, at least once a year, to ensure that it is safe for consumption.

    Here are some common tests that are typically performed on well water:

    1. Bacteria Test: This test checks for the presence of harmful bacteria, such as E. coli, in the water. This is a crucial test to determine if your water is safe to drink.
    2. Nitrate Test: High levels of nitrate in well water can indicate the presence of harmful chemicals or fertilizers, which can pose health risks.
    3. pH Test: This test measures the acidity or alkalinity of the water. Water with a pH level below 6.5 or above 8.5 can be harmful to human health and can also damage plumbing and fixtures.
    4. Total Dissolved Solids (TDS) Test: This test measures the total amount of dissolved minerals and salts in the water. High levels of TDS can make the water taste unpleasant and can also cause health problems.
    5. Lead Test: Lead can leach into the water from pipes and fixtures, especially in older homes. A lead test can determine if the water is safe to drink.

    It’s important to use a certified laboratory for testing your well water to ensure accurate and reliable results. Your local health department or environmental agency can provide information on certified laboratories in your area. Once you receive the test results, you can determine if treatment is necessary to make your well water safe for consumption.

     

    Can I conduct a DIY test on my well water at home?

    While it is possible to conduct some basic tests on your well water at home, it’s important to note that these tests may not be as reliable or comprehensive as those performed by a certified laboratory. It’s also important to follow proper procedures and use appropriate testing equipment to ensure accurate results.

    Here are some common DIY tests you can perform at home:

    1. Chlorine Test: Chlorine is often used to disinfect well water. You can use a chlorine test kit to determine the amount of chlorine in your water. If the chlorine level is too high, it can be harmful to human health.
    2. pH Test: You can use a pH test kit to measure the acidity or alkalinity of your water. This can help you determine if the water is too acidic or alkaline, which can be harmful to human health and can also damage plumbing and fixtures.
    3. Hardness Test: Hard water contains high levels of minerals such as calcium and magnesium. You can use a hardness test kit to determine if your water is hard. Hard water can cause scale buildup in plumbing and fixtures and can also make it more difficult to lather soap.
    4. Iron Test: Iron can cause a metallic taste and reddish-brown stains in plumbing and fixtures. You can use an iron test kit to determine if your water has high levels of iron.
    5. Total Dissolved Solids (TDS) Test: You can use a TDS meter to measure the total amount of dissolved minerals and salts in your water. High levels of TDS can make the water taste unpleasant and can also cause health problems.

    While these tests can provide some basic information about your well water, it’s important to have your water tested by a certified laboratory for a more comprehensive analysis. A certified laboratory can test for a wide range of contaminants, including bacteria, viruses, parasites, heavy metals, and chemicals, to ensure that your well water is safe for consumption.

     

     

    How often should I have my well water tested?

     

    It is recommended to have your well water tested at least once a year for bacterial contamination, nitrates, and other contaminants. If you have experienced any changes in the taste, smell, or appearance of your well water, or if there have been any changes in the surrounding land use or geology, it’s important to have your water tested again.

    Here are some situations when you should consider testing your well water more frequently:

    1. After Repairs or Maintenance: If your well has been repaired or any maintenance work has been done, it’s important to have your water tested to ensure that it is safe to drink.
    2. After Flooding or Heavy Rain: Heavy rain or flooding can cause contamination of well water, so it’s important to have your water tested after any such events.
    3. After Disinfection: If you disinfect your well water, such as with chlorine or ultraviolet light, it’s important to have your water tested to ensure that the disinfection has been effective and that the water is safe to drink.
    4. Before and During Pregnancy: It’s recommended to have your well water tested before and during pregnancy to ensure that the water is safe for both the mother and the developing fetus.
    5. When Moving into a New Home: If you are moving into a home with a private well, it’s important to have the well water tested to ensure that it is safe to drink.

    It’s important to note that the frequency of testing may vary depending on the location of the well, the depth of the well, the geological conditions, and the level of human activities in the surrounding area. Your local health department or environmental agency can provide guidance on the appropriate testing frequency for your specific situation.

     

    How long will it take to get the results from water testing of my well water?

    The time it takes to receive the results of your well water testing can vary depending on the laboratory you use and the tests that are being performed. Typically, you can expect to receive your test results within 1-2 weeks of submitting your water sample to the laboratory.

    However, some tests may take longer to process than others. For example, bacterial testing typically takes 24-48 hours, while testing for contaminants such as heavy metals or pesticides may take several days or even weeks.

    It’s important to note that if the laboratory detects any contaminants in your well water, they may contact you immediately to discuss the results and recommend appropriate actions. If the laboratory does not detect any contaminants, they will send you a report with the test results, along with any recommendations or instructions for further testing or treatment.

    It’s a good idea to plan ahead and allow sufficient time for testing and receiving the results, especially if you are planning to use the water for drinking or cooking purposes. Additionally, if you have any concerns or questions about the testing process or results, you should contact the laboratory or a qualified water treatment professional for guidance.

     

    How much does a well water test cost in Lakeland?

    The cost of a well water test in Lakeland, Florida, can vary depending on the type and number of tests being performed and the laboratory you choose to use.

    Typically, a basic well water test for bacteria and nitrates can cost anywhere from $50 to $100. However, if you need to test for additional contaminants such as lead, arsenic, or pesticides, the cost may be higher.

    It’s important to note that some laboratories may offer package deals for multiple tests, which can help reduce the overall cost. Additionally, some organizations or local health departments may offer free or reduced-cost well water testing for certain households or situations, such as low-income families or after a natural disaster.

    To find out the exact cost of a well water test in Lakeland, you can contact local laboratories or water testing companies for a quote. It’s also a good idea to check with your homeowner’s insurance or mortgage company, as they may cover the cost of well water testing as part of their policy or requirements.

     

    What is causing my well water sample to come back as ‘unsafe’?

     

    There are many potential causes for a well water sample to come back as ‘unsafe’, and it can depend on the specific contaminants or issues detected in the water. Here are some common causes of unsafe well water:

    1. Bacterial Contamination: The presence of bacteria such as E. coli or coliform bacteria in the well water can indicate contamination from human or animal waste, which can lead to illness if ingested.
    2. High Nitrate Levels: Nitrate contamination in well water can be caused by agricultural or lawn fertilizers, leaking septic systems, or animal waste. High levels of nitrate in drinking water can be harmful to infants and pregnant women, as well as cause other health problems.
    3. Chemical Contamination: Well water can become contaminated with chemicals such as pesticides, herbicides, or industrial waste, which can be harmful to human health.
    4. High Levels of Minerals: Depending on the geology of the area, well water may contain high levels of minerals such as iron, manganese, or arsenic, which can affect the taste, odor, and safety of the water.
    5. Poorly Constructed or Maintained Well: If the well is not properly constructed or maintained, it can allow contaminants to enter the water supply, or it can become contaminated with bacteria or other pathogens.

    It’s important to note that the specific cause of unsafe well water can vary depending on the location, geological conditions, and human activities in the surrounding area. If your well water comes back as ‘unsafe’, it’s important to contact a qualified water treatment professional or your local health department to determine the specific cause of the contamination and to develop a plan to address the issue.

     

     

    Can I clean my well myself to make my water safe for drinking again?

    It’s not recommended for homeowners to clean their wells themselves. Cleaning a well can be a complex and potentially hazardous process, and it’s best left to qualified professionals who have the equipment, training, and experience to do the job safely and effectively.

    In addition, the specific cleaning method and treatment required will depend on the cause and extent of the contamination in the well. For example, if the well is contaminated with bacteria or other pathogens, it may require disinfection with chlorine or other chemicals. If the well is contaminated with chemicals or minerals, it may require specialized treatment systems such as activated carbon filters or reverse osmosis.

    If your well water has been deemed unsafe for drinking, it’s important to contact a qualified water treatment professional or your local health department to determine the specific cause of the contamination and to develop a plan to address the issue. They can also recommend qualified professionals who can clean and treat the well to ensure that the water is safe for drinking again.